Ohio Probate Courts Can Order Treatment for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Problems

September 28, 2012

Misc. Topics

drug abuse and alcohol abuseLong gone are the days when one parent worked a 9-5, families sat down together for dinner every evening and all the children were in bed by 9 PM.  In 2012, maintaining a healthy and happy family is much more difficult than it used to be.  Modern families have to deal with several burdensome issues such as managing finances in a tough economic climate, managing time with two working parents and sometimes alcohol or drug abuse problems.

In March 2012, Ohio adopted a new law that will help families deal with the serious issue of alcohol and drug abuse within their household.  Ohio Senate Bill 117, better known as Casey’s Law, will allow Ohio Probate Courts to order mandatory treatment for severe alcohol and drug issues. The law, framed after an existing Kentucky law, will allow a court to intervene on a habitual substance abuser and force them into treatment.

The process works like this:  The petition must be brought against an adult, by a family member (parent, relative, spouse or guardian) or close associate (friends are not included).  A letter from a doctor confirming alcohol or drug abuse problems and a filing fee must accompany the petition.  In that petition, the family member must allege that the person presents an imminent threat of danger to self, family or others as a result of alcohol or drug abuse, or there exists a substantial likelihood of such a threat of danger in the near future.  It also must be determined that the person can reasonably benefit from the ordered treatment.

The final requirement is that the persons bringing the petition must pay for any services ordered by the court.  This is seen as a great deterrent, as in-patient treatment is extremely expensive.  Therefore, only families with means will be able to afford the Court Ordered program.

The text of the bill can be found here:  http://www.legislature.state.oh.us/bills.cfm?ID=129_SB_117

If you or a loved one has issues pending before an Ohio Probate Court, contact the law offices of Slater and Zurz LLP.  Their team of attorneys has experience dealing with several difficult probate issues.  Contact them by phone at 1-888-534-4850 to schedule an appointment or through their website:  slaterzurz.com.

Source:  http://www.akronlegalnews.com/editorial/4898

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About slaterzurz

Slater & Zurz LLP is an Ohio law firm of highly experienced and respected attorneys. Over the last 40 years, we have developed a reputation for getting positive results for clients. We've been trusted with handling over 20,000 personal injury cases and our clients have received more than $120,000,000.

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